DIY

How to Build a Farmhouse Wood Range Hood

When we designed the kitchen in our modern farmhouse, we chose to go with a stainless hood to add a little “modern” to the kitchen. However, after living in the house for a few months, Brooke decided that the kitchen would look better with a stained wood hood. It would add more warmth to the kitchen and tie in with the floating shelves and wood beams. At the time, I was itching for a new project, so I happily obliged.

When I made this hood, I didn’t know I would eventually be writing a tutorial on how to build it, so unfortunately I didn’t take any pictures of the process. So instead I’m providing 3D illustrations, which are probably more helpful than photos anyway.

Let’s get started. Here’s what you’ll need:

Wood

  • 1″ x 6″ clear pine
  • 1″ x 3″ clear pine
  • 1″ x 8″  clear pine

Measure and Calculate Angles

The first thing you need to do is determine the size of your hood, and this will all depend on your kitchen setup and how you plan on mounting it.

I needed the hood to be big enough to cover the existing stainless hood and wide enough to touch each upper cabinet. And I wanted the top of the angled part of the hood to be even with the top of the cabinets.

After, I took my measurements, it was time to do some calculations.

When I was sitting in geometry class as a teenager, I just knew that one day I would be able to use what I was learning. Big shout out to Ms. Dishner! I couldn’t have built this hood without you.

In order to get the correct angle for my miter cuts, I had to use the Pythagorean theorem. If you know two sides of a right triangle, you can solve for the other angles. Once I had my measurements, I used this online calculator. Here’s what I came up with:

To make the installation process easier, I decided to build the hood in two separate pieces: top and bottom. Here’s how I built the bottom.

Building the Bottom of the Farmhouse Hood

I started with the base. Here I used the 1 x 6 pine and made 45 degree cuts on the corners. Where the pieces met, I applied some wood glue, and nailed them together. I wanted to use as few nails as possible. That way the outside of the hood didn’t have a lot of holes to fill. In the illustration, the red dots indicate where I nailed.

Next, I constructed the two front corner pieces. I built these out of the 1×3 pine. Based on the calculation, the final length of these would need to be 24″, but I made them 27″ to start with. That gave me some extra length to make the miter cuts. I glued and nailed two of them together as shown in the illustration. I made two of these, one for each front corner of the hood.

Once both corner pieces had dried, I set my miter saw for a compound cut at 17 and 16 degrees. I made the cut at both ends so that the length of the piece was 24″. Compound miter cuts can be a little tricky, so here is a handy calculator.

Once the corner pieces were cut, I glued and nailed them onto the base as shown in the illustration below.

Next I measured and cut the back edge pieces on a 17 degree angle. Then I glued and nailed them on the base.

Now that I had all of the corner and edge pieces in place, it was time to start filling in the front and sides with pieces of the 1×6 pine. I started by measuring the distance between the two front corners at the top of the base, and then from the base of the front corner to the back edge. This gave me my lengths. I cut the ends of the front pieces at a 17 degree angle and one end of the side pieces at a 16 degree angle. I glued and nailed the pieces in place from the back. That way there were fewer nail holes showing.

I repeated this until the the front and sides were filled in, reducing the width of each board accordingly as I moved up the hood. For the last three pieces on the top, I used the 1×8 pine so it would come above the corner and edge pieces. This completed the bottom part of the hood.

Building the Top of the Farmhouse Hood

I constructed the top of the hood is constructed much like the bottom minus the angles. I started with the base. I used the 1 x 3 pine and made 45 degree cuts on the corners. Where the pieces met, I applied some wood glue, and nailed them together.

Next, I went ahead and glued and nailed on the first row of 1×6 boards for the front and side. This gave me something to nail the corner pieces to.

For the corner pieces and back edge pieces, I used the same method to make them as I did for the bottom part of the hood, only I used straight cuts instead of miters. After they dried, I glued and nailed them in place as shown in the illustration below.

Then I continued the 1×6 pine boards to the top, but on the last pieces I used 1×3 instead as the 1×6 would have been too tall.

Then to cap off the top portion of the hood, I repeated the same steps that I did for the base of the top, and glued and nailed it into place.

After you have your hood built, you’ll want to fill the holes, sand, and then stain. I didn’t cover any of that in this post, but let me know if you would like a part two. If so, I will go over that and the installation process.

Building this in two parts made installation much easier. Once I had the bottom part mounted, I simply sat the top piece on and that was it! Here is a illustration of the full range hood, followed by some more photos of it installed in our kitchen.

 

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18 Comments

  • Reply Christina

    Perfect! And YES, would love a Part 2 for finishing and mounting! Currently building and this will be SO dang helpful!!

    January 22, 2019 at 8:13 pm
    • Reply Henry

      That’s great! Can’t wait to see yours. I wasn’t sure if I should go into how I mounted ours, since my approach was a little different. Hopefully I can get part 2 out soon!

      January 22, 2019 at 8:16 pm
      • Reply Court

        Hey Henry! Did you guys ever make a part 2 yet of how to mount? Or could you just sum it up in a paragraph? I’m getting ready to do this project this week and would like to see the mounting portion too thanks!!

        March 24, 2019 at 4:32 pm
        • Reply Henry

          No yet. Sorry. Using a jig saw, I cut out a notch on the back of each lower corner, the thickness of the tile by half an inch. Then I put the hood into place, letting the back bottom corners rest on the top edge of the tile. So the tile is really supporting most of the weight. Then I ran a screw from the inside front of the side cabinets into the lower front side of the hood, and did the same on the other cabinet. Hope this makes sense. I’m sure everyone’s setup is different, but having our backsplash only go up so far allowed me to install ours this way.

          March 25, 2019 at 12:43 pm
  • Reply Amy

    What is the stain color of the hood?

    January 26, 2019 at 10:13 pm
    • Reply Brooke

      It’s a 1 to 1 mix of classic gray and red oak.

      January 27, 2019 at 2:01 am
  • Reply Amy Meinecke

    Thank you!!!!

    January 28, 2019 at 12:36 am
    • Reply Brooke

      Im so glad you enjoyed it!

      February 12, 2019 at 8:05 pm
  • Reply Kilee

    What is the total length of that wall (including the cabinets on both side and the hood?) you built it for? I love how it looks and want the same length for the space we will build ours in. Does that make sense?

    February 6, 2019 at 10:12 pm
    • Reply Henry

      Thanks! From wall to wall, it is 90 inches. But you could go smaller if you have a standard 30inch stove. My hood is 5 inches wider than my stove.

      February 7, 2019 at 10:44 pm
  • Reply Shannon

    What hood did you all use for the built in?

    February 17, 2019 at 1:31 pm
    • Reply Brooke

      Hi Shannon. Sorry for the delay. For some reason we’ve had trouble finding the exact model that we purchased. I’m afraid that we might have deleted the email receipt. I’m going to keep looking though and will report back when I hunt it down.

      April 22, 2019 at 8:12 pm
  • Reply Amanda

    Do you have a photo of the before stainless steel hood? I would love to see what this went over top of.

    April 2, 2019 at 11:57 pm
    • Reply Brooke

      That was before we were taking a lot of pictures of our house, but I’ll see if I can find one on one of our phones.

      April 22, 2019 at 8:10 pm
  • Reply Ana

    Best tutorial so far !!! Veryyy helpful Thank you.

    April 12, 2019 at 3:24 am
    • Reply Brooke

      Thanks! So glad you found it helpful.

      April 22, 2019 at 8:09 pm
  • Reply Catherine

    Great tutorial! I’ll be doing this for my kitchen renovation – definitely saving it for later!

    April 19, 2019 at 3:08 am
    • Reply Brooke

      Thanks! That’s awesome. Make sure you show it to us when your done.

      April 22, 2019 at 8:11 pm

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